Texas Drivers Education – Existing Programs and Most Up-to-Date Amendments

Texas drivers education consists of a series of procedures suitable for everybody – private or commercial drivers ed instructors, parent-taught programs, driver courses for adults, traditional or internet based programs, but you are supposed to be aware of the fact that every driver training instructor, school or course supplier is, regardless being private or commercial, has to be certified by the Driver Training Division and the Texas Department of Public Safety.

One has to meet the legal requirements so as to earn a driving license – your age should be at least 16 or, if not, having used the learner’ s authorization for a minimum of 6 months; that is why, a lot of teens initiate their legal driving education at the age of 15, so that before being aged 16, having a lot of time to drive under the attention of a tutor.

There are particular patterns you need to be concerned about before enrolling in a driving school’ s courses, regarding driving regulations and conditions, new amendments and laws:

* every new driver in Texas driving education courses must earn more experience in driving before becoming a legal driver (81st Texas legislature, Less Tears More Years Act, from September 1, 2009) Young drivers have to receive a supplementary 20 hours of driving time, therefore increasing the compulsory driving hours from 14 to 34. These hours have to be certified by a tutor or guardian before a young driver may proceed to stage 2 of Texas’ Graduated Driver Licensing program, and must add a minimum of ten hours at nighttime. This amendment is relevant to both parent taught and common Texas drivers education course.

* also, Driving Bill 2730, effective since September 1, 2009 denotes that all drivers under 18 years old must complete a driving test, meaning that once you complete a Texas drivers education course, you have to take a drivers test at your local DPS office so as to receive your drivers license;

* as outlined by the law, if you are a student that has applied for the Parent-Taught Driver Education Course before November 1, 2009 and hasn’ t earned the driving license yet, the Department of Public Safety in Texas will permit you to finish the course, but you are not able to attend Course 101 if you registered in or after November 1, 2009;

* according to the Texas law, persons aged between 18 and 25 who wish to become authorized drivers have to complete a six hour driver education program exclusively designed for adults or finish a minor and adult driver education course that is component of the Texas drivers instruction course (effective March 1, 2010); Texas drivers education is composed by two differentiated instruction departments: behind-the-wheel instruction and drivers ed coursework.

The parent-taught program is addressed to teens aged between 14 and 17, deals with both student and parent, and the tutor or guardian must monitor in-car driving and sign-off the completion of each objective. A teen applicant for a Texas drivers education program is able to initiate the training at the age of 14, but is not able to achieve the learner’ s authorization before age.